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What are the biggest risks to your health on a ship?

| Sep 18, 2020 | Maritime Law |

As someone who works in the maritime industry in Louisiana, you know that working on a ship is no easy task. You end up pushed to your physical limit often. You frequently face more danger than other occupations.

Because of that, you should know about the biggest potential risks you face. Once you are aware of them, you can work toward preventing and circumventing them, thus staying safer on the sea.

Long-term maritime injuries

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration discusses common dangers associated with maritime work. Some hazards create larger dangers than others. Some are immediate, while others may take a toll over time.

For example, repeated trauma or over exertion are injuries that plague you after you have worked for a while. Repeated trauma involves injuries that develop over time. Repeated vibration, pressure or motion can cause this. Over exertion involves extreme fatigue, which you often suffer from after working yourself too hard.

This can take place over hours, days or weeks. Over exposure also falls into this category. It involves wounds that develop when exposed to certain elements beyond a set period of time.

Traumatic incidents can happen in seconds

There are also injuries that happen without much warning, in seconds or minutes. Some of the more sudden and traumatic incidents can result in:

  • Lifting injuries
  • Injuries from falls
  • Burns
  • Shock injuries
  • Traumatic injuries

These sudden events often create more of a risk and result in more damage. For example, ships often work with high voltage electrical equipment. A shock incident can easily push you into cardiac arrest. Traumatic injuries also happen often. They can include everything from spinal damage from a fall to accidental impalement.

On a ship, dangers lurk around every corner. Keeping this awareness in mind and working toward strong safety measures can help you fight back and stay safe.